Monday, October 29, 2012

Rub N' Buff Q & A!

Hey you guys!  Hope you had a wonderful weekend!  Alright, straight to it, you know how I have suffered from a slight Rub n' Buff addiction?  I do love the stuff.  Well, I get a lot of questions about it, so I've compiled a little Q & A list to try and answer most of them at once.  BUT... let me start by saying I AM NO EXPERT when it comes to this stuff.  I just like the stuff and use it a lot, so these answers are from my experience and just how I do it.   : )  So here we go.





Q. Can you paint over Rub n' Buff?
A.  I have many times and have had no problems.  I usually give it a light sanding first, don't know if that is necessary, but it makes me feel better about it.  Then I paint and poly as I would anything else.

Q.  Can you use Rub n' Buff over paint?
A.  Yes, I do it all the time.


Q.  Does Rub n' Buff work on metal?
A.  Yes!  It works great on old furniture hardware, frames, lighting fixtures, etc.  The only metal, to date, that I've had a problem with it "sticking", is the builders grade yellow brass stuff.  Doesn't work so well there.


Q. Do you have to "prep" your furniture before you use Rub n' Buff?
A.  I don't. Just make sure it's clean and free of debris of course.  And, Rub n' Buff won't hide scratches, but it will highlight them.



Q. Do you need to seal Rub n' Buff?
A.  That's a yes and no in my opinion.  On some things like frames, hardware, or small detailing, I don't.  But, when I use it on wood furniture, I usually do.  I actually called the Rub n' Buff people about this, and they told me that in areas with high humidity (like Florida), Rub n' Buff can oxidize and change color, so using a sealer is a good idea.  They recommended a Varathane.  However, I use a spray Polyurethane, and have had no problems.

Q. I opened my tube of Rub n' Buff and a bunch of liquid came out, now my Rub n' Buff seems thick and cakey like.  Is it supposed to be?
A. No. That liquid stuff is super important, if you see a lot of that coming out first, put the cap back on and try to work it back into the wax by squeezing the tube with your fingers.




Q.  I tried Rub n' Buff and it was gritty, is that how it's supposed to be?
A.  No!  Here's the thing.  From my experience, some colors are smooth and creamy like, and work well... and some are gritty, and just don't work well at all.
*Colors I've found that work best (I haven't tried them all) are: Silver Leaf, Gold Leaf, Pearl Blue, Grecian Gold, European Gold, and Turquoise.
*Colors I've tried and had mixed results with are: Ebony, Sapphire, and Ruby
*Colors I've tried and won't be trying again, that are gritty, hard to work with, and not metallic looking at all are (is): Antique White

Q.  Can you dilute Rub n' Buff?
A.  Yes, I do it all the time.  I prefer to use Deglosser, but paint thinner works too.



Q.  Why do you dilute Rub n' Buff?
A.  To extend the drying time.  This stuff dries quick, and if you are trying to do a large area like a table top or something like that, you can run into problems.  See this "how to" to see what I mean about diluting.

Q.  Do you use your finger when you apply Rub n' Buff?
A.  Yes, especially when you are applying it to small areas.  I wear a latex glove when using my finger because this stuff is no fun getting it out from under your nails.  If you do get it under your nails, Deglosser, paint thinner, or acetone nail polish will help get it out.
I also use a small artist's brush to apply it at times, and a cloth, like an old T-shirt, works well too, depending on what you are working on.


Q. How long does Rub n' Buff take to dry?
A.  It dries quick, within minutes.  If it's not drying that fast... you've most likely applied it to something that it doesn't adhere to.  Try wiping it off and give a light sanding to whatever you are applying it to.  That will help give the surface some tooth for the Rub n' Buff to grab onto. (Unless we are talking about Silver Leaf, which can give off a silver residue even though it's dry... that just needs to be sealed.)


Q. How can I remove Rub n' Buff from metal?
A.  Try wiping it with Deglosser or paint thinner.



If you missed them, here are the other tips and tricks I posted about Rub n' Buff.

Shhhheewwww!  Longest post I've ever written!  Hope I didn't miss any questions.  If I did, just leave me a comment or send me another email with your question.  I'll see if I can help.
If anyone has any other helpful suggestions about using Rub n' Buff PLEASE shoot me an email with your tip or leave it in the comment box for all to see.  Would love to hear it.

UPDATE** here is another Rub n' Buff project over painted furniture! :)



Smiles!
Sammy,
~Renew Redo~

30 comments:

  1. Antique white is the first and only colour I've used which was a complete let down. I'll have to try the other colours now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awhh that stinks that it was the first color you tried! lol I agree with you 100% on it being a let down, which is a shame because I had such grand ideas for it! lol But, if you do try some of the other colors you might fall in love! So there is hope. : )

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  2. Very helpful! I've tackled my first project and I'm ready for more! Love that stuff - but could have never figured it out if it hadn't been for you! Thank YOU!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No THANK YOU! Kelli. Love your Rub n' Buff project. : )

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  3. I have used the silver, diluted with some water on a large antique round mirror I did. I thought that if I used paint thinner type stuff, it would evaporate faster. How much of a tube did you use when painting your desk (aka: large areas), what is your diluting recipe?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bonnie! Wow! I'm surprised you had any luck with diluting Rub n' Buff wax with water. Rub n' Buff is an oil-petroleum based product, so, "like" products should be used for diluting it. But yes, paint thinner does evaporate fast. : ) I used a full tube of the Pearl Blue, and a part of a tube of Silver Leaf for that desk. I use Deglosser to apply my Rub n' Buff to large areas. I put it in a spray bottle, spray the surface I'm working on then apply my Rub n' Buff. Hope that helps. : )

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Me too! Me too! Our bond is growing stronger! lol ; )

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  5. I am a Rub N Buff fan myself. Sometimes I walk around the house with a tube seeing what I can put it on! LOL! I refinish furniture and love to use this on my hardware when I can. And because it is for a customer and someone is paying me... I do seal coat it, just to be sure:)

    BTW- just discovered your blog today--love it!

    Julie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL, I know just how you feel! : ) I love, love, love, your desk redo!! Great makeovers!

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  6. So interesting and thanks for sharing. I have only used it a couple of times but can't wait to try it again. You are the queen of rub n buff ;)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi!
    Question: Would you reccomend using rub n buff on doorknobs and hinges. Want to update all my old brasst knobs but dont want to remove every knob and hinge to spraypaint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Suzanne! When you say old brass knobs... do you mean the builders grade yellow brass knobs? If so, Rub n' Buff doesn't work so well on those. : (

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

      Delete
  8. Hi Sammy- I bought a white ceramic lamp at Goodwill the other day and I am planning to apply Rub and Buff (Gold Leaf) for the first time.

    The surface is quite smooth so would this product work on this smooth surface?

    How would you recommend prepping the lamp base for this?

    Thank you for your inspiration and incredible ideas!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Dirose! It depends on the smooth surface... smooth like glass might be a problem... What is the lamp made of? As for prepping the base... if you are applying Rub n' Buff to it, no prep needed (other than it being clean) just rub and buff. : ) send me a picture of the lamp!! renewredo@hotmail.com I wonna see, I wonna see!! : )

    Smiles!
    Sammy ~ Renew Redo

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  10. Hi Sammy- do you know if Rub n Buff will work with MDF composite surfaces? Thanks! :}

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  11. Hi Sammy, I got a used metal file and it is really in very nice condition but there are just a few scratches I was hoping to hide. I looked at the color chart and nothing matches the weird greenish/goldish grey of this cabinet so I was thinking of getting Grecian Gold and Pewter and mixing them. Have you ever tried this? I'm pretty good with color matching but I've never used RNB this way.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi there! Thank you so much for such a fabulous post. I just bought this for the first time after finding your blog. I just used it on some barstools (black metal) and have a question for you. No matter what I did I
    Kept ending up with chunky streak marks. I only have one coat on right now. Is this what it's supposed to look like when done? I am trying to decide if I should try a paint thinner with it for a second coat or just trying another layer on. Curious to see what your thoughts are. So sorry to bug
    You! You sure seem what your doing so thought I would check ;)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I thought that if I used paint thinner type stuff, it would evaporate faster. Antique Brass Picture Light

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanx for this post, you made a complete explanation here :)

    I can't wait, it's hard to find Rub N Buff in my country, but finally I found someone sell it...
    Unfortunately this is rare items in my country and the price become really expensive.
    My order are on shipping process.

    I want to use it for my sculpture :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. I AM REFINISHING A DRESSER AND WENT ONLINE TO ASK A QUESTION ABOUT RUB N BUFF AND FOUND YOUR SITE,LUV IT. I SEE YOUR METHOD FOR APPLYING R AND B ON LARGE FURNITURE, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE THE PIECE [DESK] WAS STAINED. I JUST FRESHLY PAINTED THE TOP OF MY DRESSER, WON'T DEGLOSSE,R DAMAGE THE PAINTED SURFACE, I'VE USED THE PRODUCT BEFORE AND IT REALLY DULLS THE FINISH.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I just thrifted a set of retro chrome kitchen chairs, and I am considering trying to rub and buff them into a gold or copper color. This is polished chrome, so super shiny and smooth. Do you think it's worth a try?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Can I mix rub and buff with another color of rub and buff

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi! Can rub n buff be used on painted tile in a shower stall?

    ReplyDelete
  19. I tried it on a pair of boots (leatherish type) and they turned out awesome! But I think I should seal them?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi,
    Can I use this on a metal front door? It has iron work that I need to paint as well but the door doesn't look to have a traditional paint job but I do see a rubbed look that is gold over a base black. Wondering if I should paint first and then rub or use this to "paint" and rub my door. Thanks!
    Ps: I live in Florida so should I seal?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oil based Poly or water based. I'm assuming oil based, but wanted to be sure.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I used rub n buff gold leaf over flat black to get the antique brass look of an antique lamp's base that was very rusty. I couldn't save the original brass plating. It looked beautiful until I used a clear enamel spray paint over it. It ran. Its the base, so it will need to be sealed. I need to find another clear coat and start all over.

    ReplyDelete

Hey there! Leave me a comment! I'd love to hear from you. If you have a question and want a faster answer, just email me at renewredo@hotmail.com
Smiles!

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