Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Rub n' Buff Tips and Tricks!

Ok, so here is the skinny on the Rub n' Buff.  I've had lots of questions about how to use Rub n' Buff on furniture, so I'm gonna give you all the know-how I got!!  There are actually several techniques I have tried that work well.  First off here is what you need

Rub n' Buff metallic wax.  It comes in several different colors.


 If I'm using Rub n' Buff on a relatively small area, like the arms or legs of a chair, the legs of a table, frames, hardware, etc.  I'll just squeeze a big blob of Rub n' Buff on an old T-shirt and rub it on that way.  Wait for it to dry, then go back and buff it with a clean cloth to make it shine.  Usually this will do the trick on smaller areas.  


On wood furniture, after applying it with a cloth as I mentioned above, if I ever run into the problem of the Rub n' Buff not looking solid enough (meaning you can kinda see through it to the wood) then,  I'll use Liquid Deglosser to dilute the Rub n' Buff and paint it on.  


I have found that Liquid Deglosser works better than paint thinner.  Don't ask me why... it just does. No need to worry.  It doesn't degloss your finish in the end.  You can pick it up at Lowe's

Then you need a small glass cup and an artist brush.


This is how I do it.  I use a small glass cup with a little deglosser poured in the bottom and a blob of Rub n' Buff on the side of the glass.  I use an artist brush to apply it.  I do it this way so I can better control the dilution process.  It's important not to dilute too much!  It won't turn out well if you do.  I dip the side of my brush in the deglosser then rub it into the Rub n' Buff on the side of the cup, staying up out of the deglosser on the bottom. See how it is smeared all over the sides of the cup?  That's the consistency you want, moist enough to smear around, but not runny enough to run down the cup.  If it's dripping into the bottom then you are putting to much deglosser on your brush.  It will evaporate so you need to work rather quickly. Paint away!

This is the less solid look I'm talking about, that can happen, when you rub it on with a cloth,  The Rub n' Buff has not been diluted at all for the first image.



The picture below is how it looks when you brush it on using the diluted Rub n' Buff that I spoke about above  See how much more solid it looks.  You will probably have a few visible brush marks at this stage.  Once it is dry buff it with a cloth SOFTLY.


After you have buffed it, you need to let it sit for a while (24 hours is best). Letting it sit a while helps when you apply the final coat. You don't have to wait but that's how I do it to avoid pulling up any of my first coat of Rub n' Buff.


After 24 hours... use a cloth this time.  I use an old t-shirt.  Apply a layer of Rub n' Buff sparingly to wherever you need more luster, or see brush strokes.  Squeeze the Rub n' Buff onto the cloth before rubbing it onto the furniture.  Rub LIGHTLY when applying the second coat and move fast.  The amount of Rub n' Buff you use depends on the size of the piece you are working on. (Small blobs for smaller pieces, larger blobs for larger pieces) This is how it looks after applying a second layer of Rub n' Buff with a cloth.  I added gold and silver for the final coat here.  They have a very thick lustrous sheen.









When working on large furniture pieces, fill a spray bottle with Deglosser, spray the entire surface you are working on, then squeeze out large blobs of Rub n' Buff all over the area.  Quickly rub the blobs together.    Click here to see that "how to"
If you don't use the deglosser when doing large areas, you may end up with a splotchy looking finish. 
(There is a way to avoid using deglosser on large areas, but it wastes a lot of Rub n' Buff, in my opinion.  You would  need to squeeze a ton of Rub n' Buff all over the surface and rub it all together and cover the entire surface, before it dries, which means you have to work quick!)


**Also,  wear latex gloves to keep it off your hands, and it does stink so a paper mask from Lowe's works well.  I even found a pack of 12 masks at the dollar store, oh and the spray bottle too.  Go figure!

If you mess up with your Rub n' Buff you can use paint thinner/ Deglosser to remove it, or sand it, or paint over it and give it another go!

***DON'T USE THE PAINT TECHNIQUE ON LEATHER** just rub it on with a cloth undiluted.
I have also noticed that some of the colors are harder to work with than others.  I haven't tried all the colors yet, but I'll try and put together another post to fill you in on all that too!

Hope this has helped!  If you still have questions or are having trouble, feel free to give me a shout.  Maybe I can help.

***UPDATE, UPDATE***  I've done a new post on the easiest way I have found to apply Rub n' Buff on large furniture (wood). Click here to view.

***UPDATE, UPDATE*** Also... spoke with the good people at Rub n' Buff and they advised that Rub n' Buff can oxidize and change color a bit when used in high humidity climates (like Florida). A sealer should be used, and a water based Varathane sealer was recommended .  (However, I use spray Polyurethane, and have had no problems)

****UPDATE, UPDATE****  Also see Rub n' Buff Q & A


Smiles!
~Renew Redo~


33 comments:

  1. Yay that confirms it's not just me. Remember I asked you before if you found the consistency different in the silver leaf from the others? It's weird you would think they'd all be the same to work with. Love your ideas! :)

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  2. Great post. Thanks for sharing your expertise.

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  3. I just found and read your blog a couple of days ago. The first thing I did was run out and buy some Buff n'Rub and I love this stuff, so I am glad that you posted this tutorial on how you use it. Your blog is great and I can not wait to see more of what you do!! Thanks

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  4. Do you need a protective coat over it to keep it from rubbing off?

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    Replies
    1. Nope! : ) Once you've rubbed and buffed, it's not coming off. You'll have a nice shiny finish!

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  5. just because it had me tripped up for a bit, don't think you mean to use the word "opaque" to describe the difference when applying with brush vs cloth buffing. Opaque=Not able to be seen through; not transparent.

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    1. oooohh, thanks for pointing that out! I've changed it now to clear up any confusion. I guess I was thinking about glass where you can still see through it somewhat. : o

      Smiles!

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    2. as a non-handy/non-crafty woman, i need all the help i can get. and all the info you shared helps!

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  6. Ahhh...I JUST finished re-doing my desk with gold rub 'n buff...I applied it by hand, so I totally get what you mean by it appearing "blotchy". Hmmm...now I'll have to decide if I want to go over it again with a paint brush for a more even look. Thanks for the tips! I am hooked on this stuff now! :)

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    Replies
    1. Finally got some good results thanks to your tips! It looks so nice now!

      http://beautifullycontained.blogspot.com/2012/01/before-and-after-rub-n-buff-desk.html

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    2. Awesome!! So glad the tips helped! I'd love to see what you did with it. Send me a pic. if you feel like it! : )

      Smiles!

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  7. Just found this post. Will this work on mdf / fiberboard and such? Would I scuff up the surface with sandpaper first? Thank you!

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    1. Hey there! Yes it will work on MDF, and NO you don't need to scuff it up first! : )

      Smiles!

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  8. okay, i think i'm brave enough now to give it a go. did you use a small brush on that desk???? and how much r/b did you use? how does it do when applied over a paint color to add a metallic sheen?

    have i annoyed you yet???

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  9. oh, and could you add an email subscription option to your side bar 'cuz my google reader is a bit overstuffed right now.

    thanks. again.

    really.

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  10. Thank you so much for the tips. Your stuff is so inspirational! Makes me feel creative just reading the posts!

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  11. I picked up a large black china cabinet for $40 at a thrift store, and had planned to paint it. But then I got the bright idea that I should silver leaf it instead. After much internet searching, I found the rub and buff product - do you think it will look similar to silver leaf? will it need to be sealed? Yours is the most info I have found on furniture projects with rub and buff - thanks for any tipps!

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  12. Can Rub N Buff be used on polished brass fixtures?

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    1. Hey there! The yellow brass fixtures, are the only fixtures I've had a little trouble with, The Rub n' Buff doesn't always want to stay put. You may have to use a very fine sand paper to scuff the surface before you apply the Rub n' Buff. Hope that helps! Smiles

      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

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  13. I am ordering supplies to cover my daughter's new desk in flashing. Thanks again for the inspiration. However, I've read on numerous sites that the rub and buff is kind of smelly. Does this smell dissipate and how long does it take to cure. Thanks for your response. I love reading your blog. Keep up the good work and let's see more projects! Regards.

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    1. Hi Valarie! The Rub n' Buff does have a strong smell, and so does the Deglosser. Be sure to do your project in a well ventilated area. The smell goes away fast though! Hope that helps. Good luck on your project! : )

      Smiles!
      Sammy ~ Renew Redo

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  14. I just tried to do my towel holders and to holder with rub n buff. Not good. I used the antique white and my plan was to use the patina as highlights. Didn't get that far. I just rubbed the white on with a cloth let it dry and tried buffing it which did nothing. I've got most of it off now by scrubbing What am I doing wrong? Should I sand blast and paint it avwhite color than do the patina highlights or try again with the deglosser and paint brush? Thx for any advice.

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    1. Are your towel holders the yellow brassy type by chance?? That is the one metal that I have had a hard time getting Rub n' Buff to adhere too. It has to be scuffed up first. I have tried the white Rub n' Buff on leather only. I have to say I didn't like it one bit! My 3 tubes were all kind of grainy, and didn't seem to have any sort of metallic sheen at all. Maybe I just got a bad batch though. I think the sanding, then painting with a paint made for metal, would be a good option. The Patina Rub n' Buff should work fine over paint.... Keep me posted. Would love to know how it all turns out! : )

      Smiles!

      Sammy ~Renew Redo

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  15. Good to know! I just bought some gold rub n buff and needed to know how to use it. Love blogs for that:)

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  16. Hey, sorry to rez an old post. Just a question, do you think it would be possible to dye or color the gold rub and buff? Trying to find black / copper ASAP but I can't find any place in my area that sells it.

    Sweet work BTW :)

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  17. I just found this product posted on pinterest and decided to check out your blog. Love the look of the product do you know if its available in Canada. There are no Lowes stores in New Brunswick. Glad I found your site.:-)

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  18. I just did this Pearl Blue/Silver combo like you have on an old French Provincial laminate desk. We're moving to a new house and my husband wants to get rid of all the furniture he thinks is worn out or ugly. This desk was in the ugly pile. Until last night! It looks gorgeous! The first coat was scary looking, when I sprayed the deglosser on the desk and rubbed it on with a shirt. The second coat with the brush made it look awesome. I think you might be my new best friend. :) I'm doing the flashing/silver to an old ugly yellow piano my husband also wants to get rid of. I think it's going to look amazing! I'll email you pics when they earn the right to move to our new house :)

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  19. thanks for so much great info about rub n' buff!! i have a question: to my eye, it looks like in the "before" pic of the chair, i.e. where you didn't use the deglosser, that the gold finish actually looks shinier, almost mirrorlike, compared to the second picture, in which it looks much more dull - almost like spray paint. is that just because of the angle of the photo or something - are my eyes just playing tricks on me? i really want to get a nice gold finish that looks like gold leaf, which is why i'm using rub n' buff rather than spray paint... but if it ends up looking similar... hmm?

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  20. Hello, have you ever used Rub N Buff on fabrics? How does it end up?

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  21. Want to re-do a wood coffee table with a faux bronze finish. Found this post to be super helpful! Thanks!

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  22. hello there, I am turning a gold framed mirror into black and then use Rub n Buff in Silver to add a finish to the design. would you recommend using a Deglosser for that or just going over it with small quantities by hand. The mirror is a large one about 40 inches wide.I have spray painted the mirror black and its not drying. When should I start using the Rub n Buff? Within 24 hours?

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  23. Porcelain black is one women army.she is best female pop artist.she is RedOne Artist
    and best female artist in the town

    ReplyDelete

Hey there! Leave me a comment! I'd love to hear from you. If you have a question and want a faster answer, just email me at renewredo@hotmail.com
Smiles!

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